Category Archives: six counties

After the Stormont election: the way forward

by John McAnulty

The common assertion arising from the latest election in the North of Ireland is that Sinn Fein now has the upper hand. That reform of the local settlement is now inevitable and Gerry Adams has gone so far as to assert that a united Ireland is now back on the agenda.

However the loss of the overall unionist majority is largely a profound psychological shock rather than a practical issue. The seats are:

DUP SF  SDLP  UUP ALLIANCE OTHER
(inc 2 Green, 1PBP) 
28  27  12  10 8 5

 

So The DUP remains the largest party and would nominate the first minister. The loss of the overall majority relies on the dubious idea that Alliance is not a unionist party – they have in the past designated themselves as unionist to save the assembly and until recently fulfilled a role as lynch pin for the sectarian setup by holding the justice ministry position.

In addition in the coming negotiations Sinn Fein will be facing the British government. They themselves have complained that the pro-unionist positions of the British secretary, James Brokenshire, should make him unsuitable as chair.  They will also be appealing to a Dublin government hostile to Sinn Fein that acts as an agent of reaction in both parts of the Island. 

The settlement in Ireland is not designed to lead to a united Ireland and the issue depends entirely on gaining permission from Britain to hold a vote restricted to the six-county area – permission that will not be forthcoming.  Read the rest of this entry

Martin McGuinness: a political obituary

by John McAnultydownload

Many commentating on Martin McGuinness’s retirement as a public representative for Sinn Fein will not be able to resist the cliché of his journey from IRA commander to central architect of the local peace process. Fewer will draw on the metaphor of his present state of ill health and the parlous state of the settlement that was to be his legacy.

My own clearest recollection of Martin is during the attack by loyalist imagesMichael Stone on the funeral of Sean Savage (in 1988 – PF), assassinated by the SAS in Gibraltar. Two grenades exploded at my back and a mourner beside me was shot in the leg. As I retreated with other members of my family I saw Martin and a group of unarmed young men rush past me towards Stone and drive him back.

McGuinness is an extremely brave and determined man. These qualities mean that he will pursue a strategy to its Read the rest of this entry

Derry’s ‘March of the British Death Squads’ a calculated insult to Bloody Sunday dead

pol-torboid-on-extreme-right-at-recent-event-to-highlight-british-army-recruitment-in-irelandThe following was written before the Brits decided to call off their grubby imperialist parade: 

Éirígí has branded a planned march through Derry on Saturday, March 4 as “deliberately provocative” and a “calculated insult”. It is estimated that 100 serving and former members of Britain’s military forces will take part in the march.  The event is one of a series which will take place across Britain and occupied Ireland in opposition to any prosecution of British soldiers who have committed serious crimes in Ireland.

Commenting on the contentious march, Éirígí spokesperson Pól Torbóid said, “It is absolutely no coincidence that this event on the streets of Derry was announced just days after another very successful march commemorating the deaths of 14 innocent civilians on those same streets.”

“There is no doubt that the organisers of the March of the British Death Squads are being deliberately provocative to generate publicity for their event. This is nothing less than a calculated insult to the dead of Bloody Sunday and their families, as well as all the other victims of British brutality in Ireland.”

He continued, “Let us not forget that the British Army killed 14 civilians and injured another 12 in one afternoon in Derry. Many more have been killed and injured in Derry City and the surrounding areas by Britain’s official and unofficial death squads.  Éirígí is totally opposed to the March of the British Death Squads going ahead and is now consulting its members and others to identify the best way to oppose it.”

Very good Suzanne Breen article on Stormont

Very good piece in the Belfast Telegraph on Tuesday by Suzanne Breen on the demise of Stormont.  It’s rightly headed “Such is the cynicism, most couldn’t care less if lights never go back on at Stormont”: see here.

Stormont Assembly elections and People Before Profit

Gerry Carroll won a massive victory in West Belfast

Gerry Carroll won a massive victory in West Belfast

The piece below is taken from a facebook commentary here.

Well done to People Before Profit capturing seats in West Belfast and Foyle. I don’t think anyone can doubt the sincerity of Eamonn McCann and Gerry Carroll and their solid record on a range of issues including, in Eamonn’s case, the rights of prisoners, such as around the Marian Price case.

Gerry Carroll’s result, topping the poll in what has long been the Provos’ strongest area, is especially impressive.

And what a shot across the bows of New Sinn Fein this is. So much for the invincibility of their hold on West Belfast. And so much for the invincibility of the Adams strategy.

It’s also good because it shows there is a significant space to the left of the NSF constitutional nationalists. NSF may be able to take over part of the old Stoop Down Low Party vote – namely, by becoming the new stoop-down-low party! – but they are now hemorrhaging support from the old republican base.

Having said this, People Before Profit, if they are serious about fundamental social change, need to start calling for British troops out, the shutting of the MI5 base in the north, and start Read the rest of this entry

Belfast éirígí 1916 commemoration

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Several hundred people attended éirígí’s annual Easter Rising commemoration in Belfast on Monday 28th March.

Led by a seven-person colour party and young people carrying portraits of the 1916 leaders, party members and supporters paraded along the Falls Road shortly after one o’clock to Milltown Cemetery where a commemorative ceremony was held at the original Republican Plot.

The proceedings were chaired by Sharon Pickering. In her introductory remarks, Sharon made special mention of Belfast-born Winifred Carney who, along with Julia Grenan and Elizabeth O’Farrell, remained with the GPO garrison throughout the entirety of Easter week.

She added, “We must remain focused on our enemies and confident in ourselves. The struggle requires a systematic approach, it requires efficiency, sustainability, and we must continuously challenge and question ourselves.

“Strategies need to be Read the rest of this entry

Know Your Rights public meeting, Belfast, Dec 5

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Anti-Stormont, anti-austerity protest, Sat, Nov 21

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‘Stand up to Stormont Protest’
12.45pm, Sat, Nov 21st,
outside The Busy Bee,
Andersonstown, Belfast.
All welcome.

 

Public event: Revolutionary politics of Seamus Costello

download6-9pm, Saturday, Nov 14

Newtown Community Centre

Newtownmountkennedy

Co. Wicklow

 

Chair: John Davis

Speakers:
Brian Leeson (éirígí ) on the Great Natural Resources Robbery
Erika Brennan (community activist) on the Housing Crisis
Sean Doyle (co-worker of Seamus Costello) on the Politics of Seamus Costello in Today’s Struggle

Plus:
Pádraig Ó Fearghaíl (Wicklow Remembers 1916 Committee)
Ruan O’Donnell (historian, University of Limerick)

Bígí Linn

 

Collapse of ‘Duffy Three’ shows British use of internment by remand: 1916 Societies statement

DuffyThreeWhile welcoming the collapse yesterday of the case against the ‘Duffy Three’ and congratulating those involved for their ultimately successful challenge to Britain’s manipulative ‘internment by remand’ policy, the 1916 Societies note that this same internment by remand continues to exist as a functional strategy of the British state in Ireland and cal
l for an immediate end to this insidious practice.

The case in point, despite that the parties concerned had already been released in advance of yesterday’s developments, remains indicative of how the legal process has been warped to serve the requirements of the British intelligence and security apparatus. It amounts to a classic example of what many decry as ‘internment by remand’ – the malign use of extended periods of imprisonment without bail – to target and remove from society political Read the rest of this entry