Category Archives: twenty-six counties

Can ‘Rebuilding Ireland’ solve the housing crisis? Lunchtime talk, Dublin, Thursday, Jan 26

Lunchtime Seminar: Dr. Rory Hearne, TASC ‘Can ‘Rebuilding Ireland’ solve the housing crisis?’

26 January 2017 – 12:45pm to 02:15pm

On Thursday 26th January Dr. Rory Hearne, TASC, will deliver a talk entitled ‘Can ‘Rebuilding Ireland’ solve the housing crisis?’

An analysis of the effectiveness and likely impact of the Government’s housing strategy ‘Rebuilding Ireland’. The seminar will present a macro-level political economy analysis of the government’s overall approach to housing combined with an in-depth analysis of the government’s social housing statistics, the impact and role of NAMA, the re-emergence of Public Private Partnerships and it will detail some alternative policies that could provide a more human rights and equality orientated housing system.

The seminar will take place in TASC’s offices in Castleriver House, 14-15 Parliament Street, Dublin 2. (Entrance on Essex Street East).

The event, which is free of charge, will run from 12.45 tea/coffee with the seminar starting at 13.00 and ending at 14.15 sharp.

The idea of the lunchtime seminars is that you are free to bring your own ‘brown bag’ lunch to eat. Complimentary tea and coffee will be available.

Please RSVP to Sylvia Byrne on 01 6169050 or by email to sbyrne@tasc.ie if you wish to attend.

David Reed’s 1988 review of Republican POWs’ Questions of History

 

downloadby David Reed

The defeat of the hunger strike in 1981 was a severe setback for the Republican Movement. While initially, in the wake of the heroic sacrifice of the prisoners, certain political gains were made especially on the electoral front, the last few years have not seen any significant political advances by the revolutionary forces in Ireland.

The greater emphasis on electoral work and the decision to reject abstentionism in elections to the Dail has not led to the gains clearly expected. The work around ‘economic and social’ issues has not yet produced any substantial results. The revolutionary forces in Ireland have been unable to halt the growing collaboration between British imperialism and the puppet governments in the Twenty Six Counties. Finally, on the military level, the stalemate which has existed for some time between the IRA and the British and loyalist security forces remains.

Inevitably in such a period every revolutionary movement is forced to reassess and rethink its strategy if the impasse is to be broken. The Republican Movement is no exception. It is in this context that we should welcome Questions of History written by Irish Republican Prisoners of War and produced by the Education Department of Sinn Fein ‘for the purpose of promoting political discussion’. Part I has so far been made available and covers the period from Wolfe Tone to the Republican Congress (1934).

The book is a valuable historical document which uses the history of the Republican struggle as a vehicle for raising crucial Read the rest of this entry

Basin Street flats residents occupy Dublin Corporation offices

From éirígi:

Residents of Basin Street Flats and supporters have begun an occupation of Dublin City Council offices to demand that the council immediately address a range of maintenance and management issues in the south inner city flats complex. The recent flooding of a number of homes from leaking rooftop water tanks was just the latest in a long line of problems that residents have been forced to endure over recent years.

Despite the massive housing crisis gripping Dublin City, there have been continuous rolling cutbacks to housing maintenance staff levels for a number of years, a situation that neither the state nor the council are willing to reverse. With all others avenues exhausted, the residents are now fully justified in stepping up their campaign. Our representative for Dublin South Central, Damien Farrell, and other éirígi activists are participating in the protest as a show of solidarity with the residents of the Basin Street Flats.

Workers and the way forward: a socialist-republican perspective

In order to get real action, the workers will need to act for themselves not rely on ICTU leadership

by Philip Ferguson

It seems a long time now since trade union members in the south of Ireland voted to reject Croke Park 11, a deal promoted by leaders of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions in partnership with the Fine Gael/Labour coalition government in Dublin.  The current coalition, like the Fianna Fail/Green coalition that preceded it, has sought to make southern Irish workers pay for the financial crisis of Irish banks and the meltdown of the so-called ‘Celtic Tiger’ economy.

For several decades the bulk of the union leadership has pushed tripartite deals with the bosses and the state, a ‘partnership’ model which has been held up by union leaderships as far afield as New Zealand as worth emulating.  But these tripartite deals did not deliver to workers even during the ‘good times’ of the ‘boom’ periods in the 1990s and early 2000s.  Now the boom has turned to bust the partnership model has simply locked unions into accepting responsibility for the financial crisis and agreeing to the austerity measures demanded by the Troika.

Rhetoric v resistance

The leadership of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions has engaged in some token rhetoric about ‘sharing the  burden’ of the crisis and they have marched workers up and down the hill and then sent them home a couple of times.  But, in general, they have acted as faithful lieutenants of the state and capital, serving more to Read the rest of this entry

Saor Eire’s 1968 raid on the Hibernian Bank in Newbridge, Co. Kildare

by Mick Healy

photo: Mick Healy

After a raid on the National Bank in Kells, Co, Meath in 1969, Saor Eire issued their first official statement to the press claiming responsibility for the robbery and describing themselves as the Saor Eire Action Group. They signed the statement as Michael Price, using the name of the 1930s socialist-republican leader and claiming that the money would be used to finance a movement which would strive for a Workers’ Republic.

The organisation had already become partly known, however, for daring bank raids.  They had commenced expropriations from Irish banks with a raid on the Royal Bank in Drumcondra, on February 27, 1967. This was followed by raiding a Munster and Leinster Bank in Tallaght on April 11, 1968.

On Tuesday, June 20, 1968, three armed raiders wearing false beards including Sean (‘Ructions’) Doyle, a veteran from Operation Harvest (the 1956-1962 IRA Border Campaign), entered the Hibernian Bank in Charlotte Street, Droichead Nua (Newbridge).  Shouting “this is a hold-up”, they held the manager, Michael Waldron, and the bank employees at gun point while searching unsuccessfully for a Free State Army payroll that, according to their intelligence, was destined for the Curragh Army Camp. While one man guarded the door, his two comrades vaulted the counter and empted £3,474 of bank-cash into a large bag.

However, an employee at nearby Sloan’s Drapery shop, Cathal Henry, became suspicious of the strangers who entered the bank and he approached a man outside the bank standing beside the get-away Read the rest of this entry

Clare Daly speaking at éirígí ard fheis 2015 (November 28, 2015)

From éirígí facebook page:

 

Scott Masterson of éirígí speaking at protest outside Fine Gael ard fheis on Saturday (January 23)

 

Scott is one of the people accused of “kidnapping” Labour Party leader and tanaiste Joan Burton at an anti-Water Tax protest in Jobstown early last year (see here).

 

éirígí activist confronts FG senator over health cuts

 

Support the Dunnes Stores Workers, Saturday, June 6

dunnes-picket-waterfordJoin the national day of protest, Saturday, June 6.

Assemble 1pm, Merrion Square for march to Dunnes Stores Head Office on Georges Street, Dublin 2.

An injury to one is the concern of all!

Big victory for gay rights

11269286_989326261079791_5893754339816510698_nThe south of Ireland has given a resounding ‘yes’ to equal marriage rights.  The vote has gone roughly 62% for, 38% against.  In Dublin the vote is more like 70-30 and in some of the big working class areas voting booths have even shown support as high as 80%. Only one constituency – Roscommon/South Leitrim – recorded a ‘no’ majority and it was very narrow. images (1)While the Catholic, Presbyterian and Methodist churches called for a ‘no’ vote, they – especially the Catholic hierarchy – no longer have the power to determine the outcome of referenda on social issues.  The tide finally began to turn on these reactionaries in the early-mid 1990s and is now clearly moving with the forces of modernisation and liberalisation. At the same, it is important to recognise that the dominant section of the establishment in the south is now the liberal bourgeoisie.  They’re all for gay rights, but are utterly anti-working class.  They continue to impose vicious austerity on the working class.  The fight against them will be even harder than the fight against the reactionary religious hierarchies.