Public Meeting: The Grangegorman Depot and the transportation of Irish convict women to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) 1840-1852

Organised by the Stoneybatter & Smithfield People’s History Project

Saturday 5th October @ 5.00pm in the Cobblestone, Smithfield, Dublin 1.

GrangegormanThe Grangegorman Depot, the first exclusively female prison in Ireland or Britain, opened in 1836, a decade after the passage of the Irish Prisons Act. The Depot held both ‘ordinary’ sentenced prisoners and those sentenced to transportation.

Following the loss of its North American colony in 1783, Australia became Britain’s penal colony. Between 1787 and 1868 a total of 162,110 convicts were transported from Ireland and Britain to Australia.

In the period from its opening in 1836 up to 1853 a total of 3,196 women were transported from the Grangegorman Depot. But who were these women?

Bláthnaid Nolan, who recently completed a PhD in UCD Women’s Studies, will tell the story of the women convicts of Grangegorman, who lived a life of poverty and destitution in Ireland, were convicted of petty crimes, before being transported into bonded labour on the other side of the world.

It promises to be a fascinating meeting. We hope you can make it.

You can join the event at the link below. Please share with your friends.

www.facebook.com/events/391561950972851/?fref=ts

Best,

Stoneybatter & Smithfield People’s History Project

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Posted on October 1, 2013, in British state repression (general), Catholic church/church-state relations, Censorship, Democratic rights - general, Historiography and historical texts, Public events - Ireland, Social conditions, Women, Women prisoners, Women's rights. Bookmark the permalink. Comments Off on Public Meeting: The Grangegorman Depot and the transportation of Irish convict women to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) 1840-1852.

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